Personazhet më të paharrueshëm të regjisorit Quentin Tarantino

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Nuk ka rast më të mirë se sa premiera e filmit të fundit të Quentin Tarantino, Once upon a time…in Hollywood, të na kujtojë punën e tij të mëparshme.

Edhe puna e tij numëron vetëm nëntë filma në total Përmes nëntë filmave (dhe True Romance, të cilën ai e shkroi por nuk e ka drejtuar), ai ka krijuar një botë dhe personazhe ndryshe nga cilido tjetër.

Nuk ka rëndësi nëse është një atentator që kërkon hakmarrje, një aktor i plakjes që përballet me vdekshmërinë e tij në Hollivud, ose një oficer SS i njohur si The Jew Hunter, regjisori ju vë në lëvizje me këta njerëz dhe sigurohet që nuk do t‘i harroni kurrë. Me publikimin e Once upon a time…in Hollywood dhe 10 vjetorin e filmit Inglorious Basterds, në jemi bërë nostalgjik duke kujtuar personazhet e tij të mëparshme, të gjitha pjellë e gjenialitetit të tij.

Once upon a time…in Hollywood; Rick Darton dhe Cliff Booth

Not wanting to have any recency bias, let’s set these two aside for now. Personally, I have no doubt that we’ll be talking about Rick and Cliff for years to come, but easy to say when I’ve already seen the movie more times than the number of months it has been out.

Pulp Fiction; Marsellus Wallace

Again, this is not a best list. Because if it was then characters like Calvin Candie (Leonardo Dicaprio), Shoshanna (Melanie Laurent), or Mr. Orange (Tim Roth) would probably come ahead of Ving Rhames’ silky cool crime boss. But, none of them are namechecked in one of Tarantino’s most memorable — and epic — lines/sequences. “What does Marsellus Wallace look like?!” No. 10 most memorable, that’s what.

Jackie Brown; Jackie Brown

As you will see throughout this list, it’s definitely a bit of an advantage to be the titular character in a Tarantino film. In Jackie Brown, Pam Grier is surrounded by bigger stars in the moment (Samuel L. Jackson, Robert De Niro, Michael Keaton), but the veteran actress and her plottlng flight attendant rise above the rest, surely aided by Tarantino’s longtime affection for Grier.

Kill Bill; Bill

The Bride’s final target doesn’t show his face until Kill Bill: Volume 2, but his presence is felt before we ever lay eyes on him. Bill’s voice in Volume 1 alone could have earned him consideration for this list, with the placement secured by the tense, deadly final showdown between Bill and his former lover and assassin protégé.

Inglorious Basterds; Aldo Raine

Early in his career, Brad Pitt turned in a scene-stealing performance in the Tarantino-penned True Romance, and almost 20 years later, they got to officially pair up as star and director — and it was worth the wait. Whether he’s trying to pull off pretending to be Italian or carving swastikas into Nazi soliders’ heads and declaring it to be his “masterpiece,” Aldo “The Apache” is our kind of hero.

Django Unchained; Django Freeman

The D may be silent, but there’s nothing quiet about Django. From his loud blue suit to his newly discovered swagger, the slave-turned-bounty hunter apprentice is the Django Unchained character that most sticks with you, which is saying something considering Leonardo DiCaprio’s chilling turn as plantation owner Calvin Candie and Christoph Waltz’s Oscar-winning performance as Dr. King Schultz.

Inglorious Basterds; Hans Landa

If Tarantino himself calls you his best written character, then odds are that you were pretty memorable! And that’s the case for Hans Landa, a.k.a. Inglourious Basterds‘ Jew Hunter. One minute, he’s bone-chillingly scary as he interrogates a dairy farmer, only to then make you laugh with his pure delight at saying “bingo,” before putting a smile on your face as he comes to the horrifying realization that he’s being sent to America with a new permanent mark.

Pulp Fiction; Mia Wallace

Spoiler alert: The next three spots are held by Pulp Fiction characters, who naturally felt like they should all be together. Contrary to Pitt’s final line in Basterds, Pulp is widely viewed as Tarantino’s masterpiece, hence the film’s popularity on this list. And we start the Pulp run with our dancing queen, Mia Wallace, played by Tarantino’s “muse” Uma Thurman. In addition to Mia’s unforgettable presence in the film, her positioning as the lead of the promotional materials, including the iconic poster, cement her legendary status.

 

 

 

 

 

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